Posts Tagged "OD; Organisational Development;"

on Jan 3, 2019 in Blog

  Part 3: Self as Instrument for OD   Guest blog from: John Hovell PMP, CKM, ODCP   You are the primary “instrument” in OD! Organisational Development is a wide and varied field, but let’s not overwhelm ourselves, it simply starts with you. You are the primary instrument for OD work. We call this “use of self” or “self as instrument”. Many practitioners have written about this concept, especially Dr Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge. According to her, Use of Self basically means that we “dedicate time to the on-going maintenance of both self-knowledge and technical expertise.”[1] We continually develop ourselves to hone our practice and extend our OD range. There are many mindsets, skillsets and toolsets that we bring into OD, and yet they all rely on our ability to continually develop our primary instrument, which is our self. The concept of Use of Self is nearly as broad as the field of OD! Self as Instrument Overview Let’s continue to describe the concept of “use of self”. There are dozens of broad definitions for Use of Self, we will offer a few here. For a more detailed description of Use of Self, we have Mee-Yan’s permission to share her latest research with Professor David W. Jamieson. In that research, they use nine (9) “clusters” to help describe the different areas of Use of Self. For even more detail on these clusters, as well as a self-assessment, please visit their website. Definitions and Dimensions of Use of Self Use of Self is a broad and ambiguous concept. The definitions below come from known experts to help frame the general territory. Dr Mee-Yan Cheung-Judge “Whenever we are in flow with our external observation and awareness, our internal awareness of the “here and now”, and using resources we have (e.g. intellect, cognitive ability, perceptual insights, emotional texture, personality, experience, values, character, skills, social sensitivity, etc.) based on our discerning judgement/intentional choice of decisions as to what right course of action we are willing to put ourselves on the line to execute the work in order to achieve the impact the situation requires” Mary Ann Rainey and Brenda B. Jones “Acting on feelings, observations and thoughts to advance the work of the client” Charlie...

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on Nov 21, 2018 in Blog

Part 2: A framework for advancing your OD practice   – Dr Sharon Varney & John Hovell   OD practice – an evolving field Part 1 in our series on Advancing your OD Practice explained how Organisational Development (OD) thinking and practice has evolved over the past 70 years to ensure it remains relevant and important in a VUCA world [1]. It pointed out that, in the past, OD was the preserve of specialists. Yet, with increasing organisational complexity, more and more people are being involved in change and transformation work as part of their day job. So, developing an OD mindset, skillset and toolset is fast becoming an essential for all managers and professionals. And smart businesses are leveraging their change-ability by developing OD capabilities across their organisations. Over the past 70 years, OD has embraced diagnostic, dialogic and dynamic approaches to organisational change and development. But the use of the ‘self’ as the primary instument, remains a core foundation in OD practice. We use this framework (pictured above) to underpin the Advancing your OD Practice programme that we run for The Henley Forum at Henley Business School.  We believe it is a useful framework to help demystify OD and to empower those involved in organisational change and development work to take the next steps in advancing their practice: it helps OD specialists to re-appraise their ‘go to’ approaches and to ensure their thinking and practice is keeping pace with evolving developments in the field and it provides an entry-point for those who are new to OD to calibrate the strengths and skills that they bring to OD work from other areas of work and life. In this article (Part 2 of 3), we begin by exploring the 3 Ds in our framework and then invite you to think about how to get the balance right.   Diagnostic OD Diagnostic OD began in a similar way to the scientific model and the project management approach. In other words, there was a linear process to start with: problem definition, then study the problem, determine options, select and implement the best option, and finally evaluate the effectiveness of your actions. This chronological approach has been effective for decades, especially when...

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on Oct 26, 2018 in Blog

Part 1: A mindset, skillset and toolset for change   – Dr Sharon Varney   OD is for you! Saying that Organisational Development is just for OD specialists is a bit like saying computers are just for IT professionals. In the past, OD was the preserve of specialists. Yet, with increasing organisational complexity, the job of creating organisational change and effectiveness is simply too big and too complex for one team [1]. As a result, more and more people are being involved in change and transformation work as part of their day job. Managers and professionals with all kinds of job titles are working hard to introduce new, different, and potentially better ways of working. But, the problem is that few of them know how to go beyond the project plan to make the magical transition between A and B happen for teams and organisations. It’s not their fault. Few have had any training in this area. All too often, therefore, well-intentioned change efforts take an economic and emotional toll, yet fail to deliver the hoped-for benefits. So, developing an OD mindset, skillset and toolset is fast becoming an essential for all managers and professionals. And smart businesses are leveraging their change-ability by developing OD capabilities across their organisation; helping them to achieve sustained success in a changing world. A strong heritage and a rich knowledge base OD has a strong heritage and a rich knowledge base. It roots can be traced back to the late 1940s with the group dynamics work of social scientists at the National Training Laboratories in the US and the parallel group relations work at The Tavistock Insitute in the UK [2]. Taking an OD approach means involving people in creating change that affects them from the outset. Change programmes that seek to save time by not doing this up front often pay the price of an agonisingly long drag to try and get people on board later on. (If you ever see a project plan with ‘implementation’ at the end, you should be worried… very worried!) If you think that OD is all touchy-feely, think again. Taking an OD approach means working from data. Data may be hard or soft, big or small. The best...

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